Category Archives: Publishers

Church Choral Reading Summer 2015

Anticipate the Changing Seasons with
New Fall and Christmas Choral Music

Heather Sorenson

Heather Sorenson

In a Mixed-Publisher Church Choral Reading Session, the Hal Leonard Corporation and Pender’s Music Co. will present new fall and Christmas choral music. Heather Sorenson will also present new highlights from several other publishers—including Lorenz, Alfred, Shawnee Press, and Hope. Join in fellowship with others by participating with up to four members of your congregation (ex: director plus three). Registration includes complimentary music packet of most music presented and morning refreshments.

Saturday, June 27, 2015
Quail Springs United Methodist Church

14617 N. Pennsylvania
Oklahoma City, OK 73134

Schedule:
8:30 Registration, Coffee and Donuts
9:00 Session Begins
10:30 Break, Refreshments
10:45 Session Continues
12:30 Session Over

Cost: $10 per person, includes music packet
Limit 4 per church (example: director plus 3)

TO REGISTER: Call John Staton at (800) 772-8405 or
e-mail John at jstaton@penders.com

Music on display for sale will include:
Christmas cantatas • vocal solos and duets • children’s choir books • handbell music • piano duet • piano • piano/organ duo • organ

Music from Glee: It’s Not for Singers Only


The Fox TV show Glee continues to breathe new life into many classic ’70s and ’80s-era songs, as well as heighten the awareness of music and the arts in our modern-day schools. It’s the glee club that’s usually in the spotlight of the series, but luckily for today’s instrumental educators, there have been several band arrangements that have been produced, in addition to the chorals, that correlate with the show.

Therefore, the entire music department can get in on the re-popularization of many of the iconic rock songs and power ballads of decades gone by, as well as enjoy fresh, innovative versions of some of today’s hottest songs.

So, Glee-k Out! at your spring concert this year. There are plenty of arrangements to choose from, and the band (and the audience) will love it!

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Additional Songs, featured in the TV Show Glee:

Grade 1

Any Way You Want It (Journey)

Grade 1+

Defying Gravity (Wicked)

Don’t Stop Believin’ (Journey)

I Dreamed a Dream (Les Miserables)

Lean On Me (Bill Withers)

Sweet Caroline (Neil Diamond)

Grade 2

Don’t Stop Believin’ (Journey)

Sweet Caroline (Neil Diamond)

Time Warp (Rocky Horror Picture Show)

Grade 2+

Tribute to Journey (medley)

Grade 3

Defying Gravity (Wicked)

Hello, Goodbye (Beatles medley)

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Midweek Newspeak for Band and Instrumental, the series, posts to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

American Idol-ization

It’s American Idol Season on Fox, and final cuts are currently being made for the live competition shows. This brings to mind the formal vocal audition process – it was sometimes albeit painfully obvious as you watched the city-to-city auditions, that some of the singers were quite well prepared, while others simply fell apart in the heat of the moment, when it really counted the most.

If you’re a choral or voice student in an organized music program, perhaps you’re thinking about auditioning soon to get into a particular workshop event; to perform over the summer in a community theatre production; or perhaps even to get accepted into a degree program at a college or university that has a great school of fine arts.

Don’t become the American Idol statistic of unpreparedness and nervousness, or the next YouTube viral video for the wrong reasons. Find out what you can about the audition process for the specific event, production, or degree program that you’re interested in. Ask the organizer(s) lots of questions if you can, and try to find some people that have previously gone through the same type of audition, in order to get some feedback from them, too.  Make sure that you adhere to their criteria and rules, whatever it may be – song choice, length of audition, dress code, etc. It’s all important, and falling below acceptable levels in any one area could make or break your success in getting what you want.

Nowadays, in many vocal audition situations, particularly in Broadway and contemporary music, you’re not expected or even required to sing a song in its entirety.  You may actually be asked to sing only 8, 16, or 32 measures of it. What’s important to know here, is that you really need to select the right 8, 16, or 32 measures of the song – that magical part of it that shows off your range, musicality, versatility, etc.  And that can be hard to do, especially if you don’t have much experience in it to begin with.

Luckily, there’s now a wide range of music books (many with CDs available) that can help.  You can be ultra-prepared in so many ways – maybe you’ve asked many questions, practiced a lot, plan to be dressed appropriately and more – but if you’ve chosen the wrong song, you’re probably sunk, before you’ve even really begun. Don’t American Idol-ize yourself, and let that happen to you. Ask Questions. Get Prepared. And choose the right song, because success for you might be just around the corner!

 

Audition Songs for Male Singers:

Broadway Favorites
Classic Soul
Classical Greats
Elvis Presley
Film Hits
Rock Favorites
Standard Favorites

Audition Songs for Female Singers

Broadway Favorites
Broadway Standards
Classical Greats
Favorite Pop Songs
Favorite Standards

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Singer’s Musical Theatre Anthology – 16-Bar Audition

Soprano
Mezzo-Soprano
Tenor
Baritone/Bass

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16-Bar Theatre Audition

Soprano
Mezzo-Soprano
Tenor
Baritone/Bass

 

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16-Bar Pop/Rock Audition

Men
Women

Kids

Audition Songs
Musical Theatre Audition – Boys
Musical Theatre Audition – Girls

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Friday’s Focus for Vocal, the series, posts to www.pendersbuzz.com about once a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

On Being the Best

Every now and again, it’s nice to take a break from the mechanics of teaching and read something that’s informative, historical and inspirational, to give you that boost you might need in reaching your next goal. Many of the publications available from Meredith Music definitely fit the bill.

One of the newest is The Best We Can Be: A History of the Ithaca High School Band 1955-67. This inspiring story provides an extraordinary model for band programs of today and tomorrow explaining how the most creative high school band program in America’s history evolved and functioned daily, with glimpses of individuals involved including Frederick Fennell, Norman Dello Joio, Vincent Persichetti, William D. Revelli, Warren Benson, Richard Franko Goldman, Donald Sinta, Harvey Phillips, “Doc” Severinsen and Benny Goodman.

Here’s a YouTube video of Garwood Whaley, President & Founder of Meredith Music Publications, with some of his thoughts about this significant book by Frank L. Battisti and R. Bruce Musgrave:

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Midweek Newspeak for band/instrumental, the series, posts to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

Boonshaft on Teaching Music

This week is the Texas Music Educators Association Convention, and many members of our staff are away from our store(s) manning the booths there. It’s so easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of all that’s going on, once you get to San Antonio — there’s definitely something that appeals to everyone there. This year, one of our favorites is in Texas again: Dr. Peter Boonshaft.

One of Boonshaft’s latest endeavors is as the co-author of a new band method, Sound Innovations by Alfred Publishing Company. But it’s perhaps his Teaching books that resonate and speak volumes for most of us. There are three books in the series: Teaching Music with Passion, Teaching Music with Purpose, and Teaching Music with Promise.

Additionally, Boonshaft has melded the three inspirational music education books into a whole new edition, which is appropriate for ALL educators. It’s entitled Teaching Music with Passion, Purpose and Promise, and was released 2010.

Boonshaft will be presenting two sessions at TMEA, plus he’ll be in the Pender’s booth immediately following the sessions. Attend either or both of the sessions, and then stop by our booth to say HELLO!

Unleashing the Power of Sound Innovations: The Revolutionary New Band & String Method
Friday, February 11th
12:30 – 1:30pm – CC102
Clinicians: Bob Phillips (Alfred Publishing Co.) & Dr. Peter Boonshaft (Hofstra University)

The 33 P’s of How to Conduct a Wonderful Rehearsal
Friday, February 11th
2:00 – 3:00pm – CC Ballroom B
Clinican: Dr. Peter Boonshaft (Hofstra University)

Dr. Peter Boonshaft in the Pender’s Booth

Friday, February 11th
3:15 – 4:15pm – Band Island (near booth 1420)

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Midweek Newspeak for band/instrumental, the series, will post to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

Are you a Gleek?

Glee, the Fox TV show has given new life to [show] choirs, musical theater, all manner of the arts, and school music programs in general all around the country. Who knew that all those 70’s and 80’s classic rock power ballads of years gone by would enjoy such a renewed popularity? That it’s now cool [again] to sing, dance, perform in groups, and be proud of it?

Yet, while it might seem like some crazy phenomenon to some, to us — the educators, the students who have been in music and arts programs for years, and to the professionals who provide all the print music, books, instruments, and much more — we experience our own phenomenon every day. We know the value in what we do, and why it is so important to us. It’s simple. It just matters.

For educators and professionals, it has mattered at nearly every level of our lives. Most of us were students first, of course, so we’ve been involved with music for years, and cannot imagine a life without it. Educators enjoy the euphoric rush of seeing their fledgling individual or group do well in that all-important performance. Professionals in the industry at large know that without the quality goods and services supplied to those groups, that doing well can be more difficult. Therefore, there’s great satisfaction in putting that much sought-after piece of music in the eager hands of the educator, or that shiny new horn in the arms of a novice musician. It matters.

For all those students, in music programs great and small, it matters, too. Music makes you smarter; music may be your oasis; music [groups] can be your socialization; music might be your ultimate relaxation. And that’s the beauty of it, of course. Music is a like a shape-shifter — it can be whatever you want it to be — it doesn’t judge you, and it doesn’t mock you. Music makes you better. It matters.

So, are you on the Glee bandwagon yet? Come on, we know you want to…..Dream On [Queen]; Imagine [John Lennon]; Show your True Colors [Cindy Lauper], Faithfully [Journey]….

Friday’s Focus on Vocal, the series, will post to www.pendersbuzz.com about once a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

Sing-a-bration is Makin’ a Move!

Exciting, important announcement! The Pender’s Music Company summer choral event, Sing-a-bration, is MOVING! That’s right. Our weekend of workshops that has been held in Grapevine for the last several years is getting a new home, and we’re all pretty excited about it around here, so we wanted to get the word out early to all of you.

We’re moving to Lewisville, TX to the Lewisville Convention Center, aka The Hilton Garden Inn. The dates for 2011 are from Thursday, July 14th through Saturday, July 16th. All workshops, each day (and the Pender’s on-site store), will be held in the convention center meeting space, which is attached to the Hilton Garden Inn. This facility is conveniently located at Exit 447B of Interstate I-35, near the intersection of I-35 and State Highway 121.

We have many reasons to be excited about moving to Lewisville and the Hilton Garden Inn:

  • There is more than enough meeting space for all of our workshops (and the Pender’s store). We’ll all be under ONE roof, for the duration of the event.
  • The Hilton Garden Inn is only three years old. It’s a beautiful hotel, is carpeted throughout, etc. The convention space is attached to the hotel, and can be accessed through an inside corridor near the main lobby, or through its separate main entrance that is adjacent to a huge parking area (free). There will be plenty of room for everyone.
  • In addition to the Hilton Garden Inn, there are several great hotels in the area, and we’ve set aside room blocks at three others, with very reasonable room rates, beginning at $79 per night.
  • The larger meeting space(s) allow us more flexibility in scheduling, and what we’re able to offer each of you. We’ve listened to your feedback, and we have some wonderful plans in store (more on that in a bit).
  • All food and beverage will be catered through the Hilton Garden Inn, which means that the hotel’s catering/convention staff will be there for us, the entire time.
  • We will have a completely separate area set up for lunch, at round tables – and if the weather is good, we may even dine out alfresco, on the Tuscany Garden Patio, with its covered pavilion and fountain.
  • Free wireless internet throughout the meeting space.
  • The Lewisville Convention Center is just minutes from Vista Ridge Mall, many other shopping areas, dozens of restaurants, etc. With Lewisville Lake, golf courses and more, there’s something in the area for everyone.

The NEW Schedule

Thursday, July 14th (9am to 4pm)

The first day remains our traditional Sing-a-bration day – Multi-Publisher workshops, in two tracks – Elementary and Secondary — with Andy Beck (Alfred Publishing Co.), Mary Lynn Lightfoot (Heritage Music Press), and Greg Gilpin (Shawnee Press).

Friday, July 15th (9am to 4pm)

For Day Two, we have something NEW! Yes, it’s still Hal Leonard’s popular Joy of Singing (not to worry), but for the first time ever, this day will ALSO be in two tracks – Choose Elementary or Middle School/High School. The Elementary track WILL include Classroom Reading with Cristi Cary Miller. The other featured clinicians from Hal Leonard, for both tracks, are Roger Emerson, Mac Huff and John Jacobson. We also welcome Denise Eaton for the first time, to round out the Middle School/High School slate of presenters.

Saturday, July 16th (9am to 4pm)

On Day Three, there will be two different workshops, running concurrently – the ever-popular John Jacobson Choreography and Reading session, as well as a full day of Joy of Worship, our church session.

Half of the church session will be presented by Hal Leonard and their affiliated publishers (Brookfield Press, Daybreak Music, Integrity, Fred Bock, and more); the other half will be our Multi-Publisher offerings (Alfred, Beckenhorst, Lorenz, Roger Dean, Shawnee Press, and others). Our clinicians for Joy of Worship will include Joseph Martin and Mary McDonald.

Hotel Information

Here is the information regarding the blocks of rooms that we have set aside for Singabration. Please use the appropriate Group Codes, etc, in order to receive the correct rate.

Hilton Garden Inn (Lewisville Conv Ctr)
785 SH 121
972-459-4600
$129 Group Code PENDER

Hampton Inn & Suites
2650 Lake Vista Dr
972-315-3200
$99 Group Code: PEN

Courtyard Marriott
2701 Lake Vista Drive
972-316-3100
$89 Group Code: Singabration

Comfort Suites
755A Vista Ridge Mall Dr
(972) 315-6464
$79 *Mention Pender’s Music Co.

Piano Teaching and YouTube

The core job description of Piano Teaching has not really changed over the years. If you’re an independent piano teacher, with your own teaching studio, you know what’s included in the qualities that define a good teacher. Beyond the obvious music skills required for the job, and the required equipment (physical space and a piano); you must have good communication skills, be organized, flexible, and willing to work perhaps long and variable hours. In most cases, you need to be able to work with all kinds of people, at all ages – beginners, intermediate students, and advanced-level pupils.  And in order to keep up with the times, you need to be open to new technology, and embrace it in ways that maybe twenty years ago would’ve been surprising to you. Computers and all means of digital media are here to stay, and media, in general, continues to embed itself further into our lives every day. And piano teaching with media is no different.

Most every popular piano method today includes a CD, which particularly helps with a student’s home practice. Now, beyond the CDs, you can go to another source, that can give YOU teaching tips when you need them. Videos. YouTube videos. One good example is the Alfred Premier Piano Course. It now has an entire series of YouTube videos online, that include highlights performed by Dennis Alexander and more, from the entire Premier library, including the full range of Lesson and Performance books, as well as an array of related Technique Tips videos.

Piano Teachers, watch these helpful teaching tips from Alfred‘s Premier Piano Course, co-author, Dennis Alexander:

Premier Piano Lesson 1A and  Performance 1A
Performed by Dennis Alexander, featuring Lily
I Like Soccer [Perf 1A pg. 30]
Time to Celebrate
[Lesson 1A pg. 62]

 


Premier Piano Lesson 1B
Performed by Dennis Alexander
Butterfly [pg. 25]
My Sombrero
[pg. 40]
It’s a Brand New Day
[pg. 46]

 


Premier Piano Lesson 2A
Performed by Dennis Alexander
Au Clair de la Lune [pg. 8]
The Food Court
[
pg. 10]
Qwerty [
pg. 21]


Premier Piano Lesson 2B
Performed by Dennis Alexander
Pirates at Sea [pg. 16]
Over the Rainbow
[
pg. 38]
Fiesta de Espana
[pg. 46]

 

Premier Piano Lesson 2B
Performed by Dennis Alexander featuring Eliana
Science Fair [pg. 25]
Over the Rainbow
[
pg. 38]
Island Calypso
[pg. 40]

 

Premier Piano Lesson 3
Performed by Dennis Alexander
Midnight at the Museum [pg. 28]
Watercolors [
pg. 37]
La Mia Tarentella
[pg. 38]

 

Premier Piano Lesson 4
Performed by Dennis Alexander
Scenes of Granada [pg. 30]
Premier Sonatina
[
pg. 20]
The Great Smoky Mountains
[pg. 44]

 

Premier Piano Lesson 5
Performed by Dennis Alexander
Sonatina in C Major Opus 36, No. 1 [pg. 32]
Greek Festival
[
pg. 28]
Barcarolle
[pg. 46]

 

Premier Piano Lesson 6
Performed by Dennis Alexander
Toccata ritmico [pg. 24]
Nocturne in Db Major
[
pg. 26]
Festival Fantastico
[pg. 54]

 

To view even more videos from the Alfred Premier Piano Course, including selections from the entire Performance series, as well as Technique Tips, go to our YouTube Channel Playlist, or visit our Facebook Fan Page, and click on the YouTube Tab.

Movement Ideas for Treble Choirs

Movement Ideas for Treble Choirs

(by Sally K. Albrecht; provided by Alfred Publishing Co.)

Each year, Andy Beck and I film a DVD containing choreography ideas for your choirs. This year’s Shine choral movement DVD offers complete staging for the following new 2-part Alfred choral titles, appropriate for winter or spring concerts.

1. Shout for Joy is a rhythmic song of joy written in a partner-song style, featuring hand claps plus optional trumpet and percussion. I enjoy using this as a vibrant and sophisticated concert opener.

2. Grandma’s Feather Bed is a novelty arrangement, including lots of silly “oinks,” imitation banjo sounds, snoring, and country-style craziness. Grab lots of bright-colored quilts and bedspreads for the front row to pull up on the chorus each time. You’ll also need some stuffed animals, including of course “the piggie we stole from the shed.” Yee-haw!

3. Esta Es el Tiempo is a multicultural gem; part Spanish, part English. The staging for this one includes lots of easy arm movement, rhythmic claps, and “tummy walks.” Incorporate some appropriate live rhythm instruments for a special touch.

4. Rocking Pneumonia and the Boogie Woogie Flu gets a fresh and funky treatment. The staging plays with the great lyrics throughout, “I wanna jump but I’m afraid I’ll fall, I wanna holler but the joint’s too small.” It might be fun to feature a few select couples doing the choreography out in front, with the rest of the ensemble joining in on the chorus/echo sections.

5.  Joyful Joyful is a jubilant concert work which includes a refrain from Beethoven‘s Ninth Symphony. The movement for this one is energized and elegant, but still works great on choral risers.

6. We Are One is an uplifting song of unity, offering the timeless message “We are one in music, we are one in song!” On the Shine! DVD, we show you sign language, which can be used to enhance this choral. Consider using your entire group of singers on the chorus and feature select students to sign the verses.

7. Shine a Little Light is my favorite closer this year. It’s got a bit of gospel, a bit of  This Little Light of Mine, and two small solos. The rousing number features great upper torso movement, snaps, and claps that work well on choral risers.

On all of our choreography DVDs, we demonstrate the choreography in three sections:

1. Complete performance with Sally and Andy facing the camera, mirroring your movements.

2. Instructional time, with explanations, descriptions, and options given as needed.

3. Exclusive “Double Shot” performance, with Sally and Andy facing a mirror — you see the movements both from behind and in the mirror.

Let us help make your choir “shine” in an upcoming concert!

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Elementary Music Mondays, the series, will post to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

Vocal Jazz Ensemble, anyone?

It’s Choral Cache Thursday @ Pender’s Music Co.! As we begin 2011, we also begin a new initiative — The Pender’s Buzz — an added way in bringing content, resources, teaching tidbits & strategies, social media and more to our loyal customers. And since our home base is in Texas, early 2011 is filled with preparations in getting ready for TMEA. So it’s quite fitting that one of our inaugural posts begins with just that! So, here we go…

Don’t miss all of the Alfred choral sessions at TMEA February 9-11! School choral reading sessions will feature incredibly popular clinician Sally K. Albrecht presenting new choral arrangements of pop titles that can be performed by both large and small choral ensembles! When you get a chance, check out Alfred’s clinic schedule!

The annual Jazz Education Network Conference was just last week, so while the genre is fresh on our minds, it’s a great time to evaluate the ins and outs of adding a vocal jazz ensemble to the choral curriculum. Small vocal groups are really popular right now, so take a look at this article, entitled How Do I Start a Vocal Jazz Ensemble by Darmon Meader, Arranger, Saxophonist, Conductor, Singer, and founder of New York Voices:

“The vocal jazz ensemble world has continued to grow and develop over the past few decades. Over the past 50 years, groups such as Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, Singers Unlimited, The Manhattan Transfer, and New York Voices have given this idiom significant exposure. Like instrumental jazz before it, vocal jazz has become more and more respected in the public school education system.

However, the vocal jazz ensemble is a bit of a “mutt” or hybrid, which can often confuse and frustrate choral enthusiasts and educators. Though an SATB style of music, the roots of the style are deeply ingrained in instrumental jazz. SATB vocal jazz voicings are often more related to jazz piano voicings or big band saxophone section writing than to traditional choral sensibilities.

Over the years, I have had many choral directors approach me, asking how to start a vocal jazz ensemble. Many of these directors had vast choral experience, but were new to the jazz idiom and found the whole thing a bit daunting. So, what does this mean for the choral instructor who is venturing into this for the first time? First of all, it is important to have a solid understanding of basic jazz harmony. Understanding and being able to recognize (both visually and aurally) common jazz chord progressions, song forms, chord symbols, and upper-structures such as 9, #11, & 13 are important steps to being able to develop a solid vocal jazz choir.


Most SATB vocal jazz writing uses a concept called “four-way close” writing. This means that the harmony is conceived from the melody note down, with all chord notes (including upper-structure notes) in play. What this means is that the vocalists will often be singing much more dense and challenging harmonies than found in their traditional choral repertoire. The Sopranos almost always sing the melody, which is usually the easiest part. The Altos may have some challenging harmony notes, but more often then not they are still singing in a comfortable relationship with the Soprano part. The Tenors and Basses usually have the most challenging parts, so it is safe to say that your vocal jazz ensemble will only be as solid as the men that sing in the ensemble. Your male vocalists will need extra attention to develop their ears for this type of challenging harmony. In addition to traditional warm-ups, give your men some warm-ups that develop their jazz harmony senses: hearing and singing tri-tone 7ths and 3rds between the two parts, singing major and minor 2nds between parts, and singing major and minor 7ths between parts. These are just a few ideas that reflect the types of harmonic relationships found in vocal jazz writing.

Even though the Alto, Tenor, and Bass parts are often less melodic, they are just as important as the Soprano part. So, encourage the lower voices to think of their parts not only as harmonic support, but as melodic entities unto themselves. In New York Voices, we often talk about thinking in two planes at once: the vertical plane involves tuning, matching vowels and tone, and dynamics, while the horizontal plane involves the melodic direction of all four parts.

Vibrato or no vibrato? As I mentioned earlier, vocal jazz is a direct off-shoot of instrumental jazz. Since the Bebop era and beyond, instrumental jazz has used vibrato sparingly, more as a color or device than as a natural part of the sound. This developed both for stylistic and harmonic reasons. By the nature of jazz writing, straight tone often is required to allow the harmonies to resonate properly, whether being played by a big band, or sung by a choir. With that said, there is room for some vibrato at times. Some songs may incorporate a looser style or gospel influences where vibrato is more appropriate. You also may find that longer chords may allow for vibrato to be added once the harmony has been established. Also, the larger your ensemble, the less room there is for vibrato.

A couple of closing thoughts:

• Listen, listen, and then listen some more. The more jazz your students listen to, the more comfortable they will become with the idiom.
• When picking repertoire, be realistic about the reach and abilities of your ensemble. We would all love to sing Gene Puerling arrangements, Take Six repertoire, or the entire New York Voices songbook, but most groups are not ready for that level of harmonic and rhythmic complexity. Explore easier and medium level repertoire to find music that will challenge you and your ensemble, without overwhelming them.
• Lastly, if you have an instrumental jazz program in your school, try to connect with the instrumental jazz faculty and students. Your instrumental jazz instructor might be able to add valuable input, and you also might find a few instrumental students that would like to sing in your ensemble. Who knows, you might have a budding young singer sitting in the sax section of your school’s big band. Come to think of it, that’s how I got my start in all of this vocal jazz craziness!”

Choral Cache Thursdays, the series, will post to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

(Article provided by Alfred Publishing, Co.)