Category Archives: TMEA

TMEA Convention 2017

TMEA Convention 2017

JOIN US FEBRUARY 8-11, 2017 IN SAN ANTONIO

Pender’s looks forward to setting up 40 booth spaces at the Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center in San Antonio for the Texas Music Educators Association Clinic/Convention. This will take place February 8-11 and is the largest event of its kind in the nation, with more than 26,000 attendees. Come by to check out our stock of sheet music and related materials from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday and Friday or from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday.


PRE-ORDER FOR CONVENTION

Need something specific? Let us save you some valuable time by placing your order with us in advance and picking it up at TMEA! Build a wish-list here on the site or email your list to orders@penders.com. Let us know that you would like to pick up the items during the convention on any order or PO, and we’ll have your materials ready when you arrive. To ensure that your request is completely filled in time for the show, we suggest sending us your purchase order early.

Pender's AppUSE THE PENDER’S APP TO PREVIEW & LISTEN TO SHEET MUSIC
Download the free Pender’s app on your smartphone, click “scan barcode,” and hold your phone over the barcode of most sheet music. You can view, listen, and purchase music immediately or, if you’re logged into your Pender’s account, add products to your wish-list.

Download on the App Store Get it on Google play


CARROLLTON LOCATION CLOSED FEB 7 – 11 FOR TMEA

The Dallas (Carrollton) Pender’s location will be closed Tuesday, February 7 to Saturday, February 11 to prepare for, and participate in, the TMEA Convention. Our Denton and Oklahoma City stores will remain open to assist you.

Henry B Gonzalez Convention Center

TMEA 2016 in San Antonio

We’re at the Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center in San Antonio this week (February 11-13) for the TMEA 2016 Clinic/Convention. With over 4,800 square feet of space, our booth will be one of the largest at the convention! Stop by & check out our new Pop Music, our great selection of UIL music, musical gifts, and so much more! Download our Pender’s app at the App Store or Google Play to listen while you shop! (Don’t forget to bring your headphones!). Looking for something new? Check out Richard Floyd’s new book, music from Star Wars: The Force Awakens or Habits of a Successful Musician. Not sure what you’re looking for? Come see us at the booth & we’ll help you find what you need. Hope to see you there!

Convention hall is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Come see us!

TMEA Clinic/Convention

Use of the TMEA logo and name does not imply TMEA endorsement or sponsorship of the company or product.

Use of the TMEA logo and name does not imply TMEA endorsement or sponsorship of the company or product.

It must be convention season! We’ll be setting up 48 booth spaces at the TMEA Clinic/Convention at the Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center in San Antonio. The convention will takes place February 11-13 and is the largest of its kind in the nation, with over 26,000 attendees. Come by to check out our stock of sheet music and related materials from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday and Friday or from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday.

Let Pender’s save you valuable time by placing your order with us in advance, and picking it up at the conference! Build a wish-list on our website or email your list to orders@penders.com. Be sure to let us know that you would like to pick up the items during the TMEA convention on any order or PO sent for this purpose, and we’ll have your materials ready when you arrive. We suggest sending us your purchase order or list by Monday, January 25th to ensure a complete fill of your requested items.

2015-2016 TMEA All-State Choir

The 2015-2016 TMEA All-State Choir music has been announced, and is available to order now!

Complete is priced from $22-$28,
Women’s is priced at $17-$23, and
Men’s is priced at $17-$23.

Take 10% off singles when ordering 10 or more copies per title by September 1, 2015. Order your packet online today, or give us a call:

Denton
800-772-5918
local 940-382-7124

Dallas
866-589-0751
local 972-818-1333

Work Backwards for Success

A Choir Teacher Prepares for the New School Year

[by Guest Blogger, Denise Eaton]

We are people of “beginnings” but I have found that teaching requires something more from me. Instead of thinking about the beginning of the year, think backwards. Make a list of the things that went well last year and the things upon which you would like to improve. Be very specific about both your strengths and weaknesses as a teacher. One example could be that you feel very good about your ability to teach repertoire, but your classroom organizational skills need improvement. While thinking in that vein, begin planning to implement the “how to’s,” “what to do” and “what not to do’s” which will effect a successful beginning.

Confession: After twenty-nine years in the profession, I still attend the “Tried and Proven” and “Jump Start Your Year” -type sessions at conventions because I fret over what to do at the beginning of the year. They target young teachers but I am proof that you can teach an old dog new tricks. It is crucial that there be a thorough classroom management plan in order to establish boundaries and expectations between you and your students. Procedures for checking roll, getting in seats, distribution of music/materials, picking and putting up folders, etc. must be well thought-out. Anticipate and have a plan for anything and everything your students will “throw” at you and know that it is impossible to over prepare.

Consider the concepts you taught last year, how you would like to build upon them, and any new ones you would like to teach this year. My list consists of:

  •  Continued rhythm growth: Extracting rhythms from repertoire, review of rhythm and relative duration (a very basic presentation of note values), and through selected drills from the Sueta Rhythm Vocabulary (ask your band director – he/she should have Sueta and many more you could use).
  • ŸInterval identification and drills: We begin the year speaking and singing steps and thirds, steps and thirds, steps and thirds. It is impossible to over enforce these basic tenets of sight reading throughout the year. Next we’ll begin the introduction of fundamentals from the SMART Book  in the tonality of the song(s) being introduced.
  • Ÿ Sight Reading: My high school Chorale used to begin the year sight reading The Lord Bless You and Keep You. Since it is four-part, it is at least eight days of sight reading, as everyone learns all four parts. The order of teaching events consisted of : chant text in rhythm, audiatesolfegge, and then sing solfegge.  The “amen” section is a great place to begin as the choir can successfully make the transition from syllables/neutral syllables to text. The song will be a great way to get them singing, but we would also begin some sort of sight singing series, be it SMART, Jenson, or portions of each.
  • ŸRepertoire: [All the time] I’m listening to CDs, digging through my “possible” music stacks, ordering single copies of songs heard while judging, attending festivals, and conventions.  Initially, my “possible” stacks start off high; I put anything and everything I think I might be able to teach plus all that my choir might be able to execute. It is then time to play through the songs, looking at range, harmonies, etc. all the while paying particular attention to exposure of each part.  This helps determine whether the song will show off a choir’s strengths or draw attention to their weaknesses. Eventually, there is a short stack for each choir. After much study and thought to what will provide a varied and interesting program, next is score study and teaching material preparation. It is always good, however, to keep a few songs in reserve; once you have actually heard your choir and you get to know their collective strengths/weaknesses, your repertoire choices could change.
  • ŸAssessment: Implement some creative ways to assess your students. Assign a part learning assignment using technology (Carl Fischer and BriLee have FREE down-loadable part-by-part recordings online); and writing assignments – nothing long and elaborate – merely a tool to get to know students better and to assess their strengths and weaknesses as communicators. In addition to their writing, the students will develop a word bank of musical terms and any vocabulary I use when teaching that they can not readily define. Rhythm counting drills are always fun and can be made into a competition/game between sections.

In closing, I hope that by working backwards, you can move forward as a teacher this year. Don’t be afraid to ask for help, to ask questions and to share your ideas with trusted colleagues in order to get feed-back and encourage dialogue. We are all in this together!

— Denise Eaton, a former TMEA President and active educator, joined the editorial team of Carl Fisher in 2011, where she serves as their choral editor. Carl Fischer, and their sister company, Theodore Presser, are leading publishers of educational choir sheet music, band sheet music, piano sheet music, orchestra sheet music, and much more.
 
 

The Magnifica @ TMEA | TCU | TWU | UNT


The Magnifica
Brass Quintet from France @
TMEA | TCU | TWU | UNT Feb. 6, 7 & 10, 2012
 

Pender’s Music Co., Arpeges of France (IMD), and Music 1st are bringing the Magnifica Brass Quintet to the February 2012 Texas Music Educators Association (TMEA) Convention in San Antonio. The members will be presenting a master class and evening concert during the TMEA convention at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. They will also be spending time in the Pender’s Music Co. Booth (beginning @ #1219) throughout the weekend.

In addition to their appearance at TMEA, the Magnifica will also be presenting master classes and concerts at:

UNT on Monday, Feb. 6;

TCU on Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 6 and 7; and

TWU on Tuesday, Feb. 7.

All university events are free and open to the public.

Dr. Etienne Stoupy (TWU) & David Begnoche (TCU)

are scheduled guest artists.

NOTE: Magnifica performance music and CDs will be available for purchase at each of the venues.

One O’Clock Lab Band @ TMEA

Hopefully all of you jazzers out there @ the TMEA Convention made it to the University of North Texas One O’Clock Lab Band concert that was held last night at the Lila Cockrell Theatre. If not, however, all is not lost. Pender’s is one of the primary distributors of UNT’s Lab Band recordings.

UNT’s premier jazz ensemble, the One O’Clock Lab band, was nominated for a Grammy (Best Large Jazz Ensemble) in 2009 for their CD, Lab 2009; their conductor, Steve Wiest, was also nominated that year for his composition, Ice-Nine (Best Instrumental Composition), which is recorded on the same CD.

The UNT College of Music, their Jazz Studies Program (the first of its kind in the nation), and the Lab Band traditions have a great history in North Texas, as well as across the country. If you missed the performance at TMEA, maybe you can catch one later in the spring.

Boonshaft on Teaching Music

This week is the Texas Music Educators Association Convention, and many members of our staff are away from our store(s) manning the booths there. It’s so easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of all that’s going on, once you get to San Antonio — there’s definitely something that appeals to everyone there. This year, one of our favorites is in Texas again: Dr. Peter Boonshaft.

One of Boonshaft’s latest endeavors is as the co-author of a new band method, Sound Innovations by Alfred Publishing Company. But it’s perhaps his Teaching books that resonate and speak volumes for most of us. There are three books in the series: Teaching Music with Passion, Teaching Music with Purpose, and Teaching Music with Promise.

Additionally, Boonshaft has melded the three inspirational music education books into a whole new edition, which is appropriate for ALL educators. It’s entitled Teaching Music with Passion, Purpose and Promise, and was released 2010.

Boonshaft will be presenting two sessions at TMEA, plus he’ll be in the Pender’s booth immediately following the sessions. Attend either or both of the sessions, and then stop by our booth to say HELLO!

Unleashing the Power of Sound Innovations: The Revolutionary New Band & String Method
Friday, February 11th
12:30 – 1:30pm – CC102
Clinicians: Bob Phillips (Alfred Publishing Co.) & Dr. Peter Boonshaft (Hofstra University)

The 33 P’s of How to Conduct a Wonderful Rehearsal
Friday, February 11th
2:00 – 3:00pm – CC Ballroom B
Clinican: Dr. Peter Boonshaft (Hofstra University)

Dr. Peter Boonshaft in the Pender’s Booth

Friday, February 11th
3:15 – 4:15pm – Band Island (near booth 1420)

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Midweek Newspeak for band/instrumental, the series, will post to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

John Jacobson @ TMEA & in the Pender’s Booth 02/11

John Jacobson, now a bonafide YouTube sensation, will be at the TMEA convention on Friday, February 11th to speak about his new publication written in collaboration with Cristi Cary Miller, Order from Chaos.

Incorporating tidbits from the book, Jacobson will show you how to embrace the chaos, discuss the importance of having a plan, highlight how to get and keep your students’ attention and more!

Then, shortly after his session, John will be in the Pender’s Booth, from 5pm to 6pm. It’ll be a great time for you meet with him further — and have him sign a copy of his book, too!

Remember:

Order from Chaos: Taming the Wild Classroom
Clinician: John Jacobson, Hal Leonard Corporation
3:30 – 4:30 PM / CC BALLROOM C3

Followed by:

Meet and Greet John Jacobson
Pender’s Booth – Elementary Section (near booth #1620)
5:00pm – 6:00pm

In the meantime, did you see John’s debut on the Ellen DeGeneres show? For Ellen’s birthday, he went to the show’s studio and taught her staff the routine to “Double Dream Hands” (aka Planet Rock by Jacobson & Huff). He then led them in a surprise performance that was aired on January 26, 2011. John and his routine has garnered quite a following: it has been recreated, spoofed and posted many, many times on YouTube.

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View other John/Ellen “Double Dream Hands” videos on our YouTube channel, and on our Facebook page, under the YouTube tab….see you on Friday, February 11th @ TMEA!

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Elementary Music Mondays, the series, will post to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

Vocal Jazz Ensemble, anyone?

It’s Choral Cache Thursday @ Pender’s Music Co.! As we begin 2011, we also begin a new initiative — The Pender’s Buzz — an added way in bringing content, resources, teaching tidbits & strategies, social media and more to our loyal customers. And since our home base is in Texas, early 2011 is filled with preparations in getting ready for TMEA. So it’s quite fitting that one of our inaugural posts begins with just that! So, here we go…

Don’t miss all of the Alfred choral sessions at TMEA February 9-11! School choral reading sessions will feature incredibly popular clinician Sally K. Albrecht presenting new choral arrangements of pop titles that can be performed by both large and small choral ensembles! When you get a chance, check out Alfred’s clinic schedule!

The annual Jazz Education Network Conference was just last week, so while the genre is fresh on our minds, it’s a great time to evaluate the ins and outs of adding a vocal jazz ensemble to the choral curriculum. Small vocal groups are really popular right now, so take a look at this article, entitled How Do I Start a Vocal Jazz Ensemble by Darmon Meader, Arranger, Saxophonist, Conductor, Singer, and founder of New York Voices:

“The vocal jazz ensemble world has continued to grow and develop over the past few decades. Over the past 50 years, groups such as Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, Singers Unlimited, The Manhattan Transfer, and New York Voices have given this idiom significant exposure. Like instrumental jazz before it, vocal jazz has become more and more respected in the public school education system.

However, the vocal jazz ensemble is a bit of a “mutt” or hybrid, which can often confuse and frustrate choral enthusiasts and educators. Though an SATB style of music, the roots of the style are deeply ingrained in instrumental jazz. SATB vocal jazz voicings are often more related to jazz piano voicings or big band saxophone section writing than to traditional choral sensibilities.

Over the years, I have had many choral directors approach me, asking how to start a vocal jazz ensemble. Many of these directors had vast choral experience, but were new to the jazz idiom and found the whole thing a bit daunting. So, what does this mean for the choral instructor who is venturing into this for the first time? First of all, it is important to have a solid understanding of basic jazz harmony. Understanding and being able to recognize (both visually and aurally) common jazz chord progressions, song forms, chord symbols, and upper-structures such as 9, #11, & 13 are important steps to being able to develop a solid vocal jazz choir.


Most SATB vocal jazz writing uses a concept called “four-way close” writing. This means that the harmony is conceived from the melody note down, with all chord notes (including upper-structure notes) in play. What this means is that the vocalists will often be singing much more dense and challenging harmonies than found in their traditional choral repertoire. The Sopranos almost always sing the melody, which is usually the easiest part. The Altos may have some challenging harmony notes, but more often then not they are still singing in a comfortable relationship with the Soprano part. The Tenors and Basses usually have the most challenging parts, so it is safe to say that your vocal jazz ensemble will only be as solid as the men that sing in the ensemble. Your male vocalists will need extra attention to develop their ears for this type of challenging harmony. In addition to traditional warm-ups, give your men some warm-ups that develop their jazz harmony senses: hearing and singing tri-tone 7ths and 3rds between the two parts, singing major and minor 2nds between parts, and singing major and minor 7ths between parts. These are just a few ideas that reflect the types of harmonic relationships found in vocal jazz writing.

Even though the Alto, Tenor, and Bass parts are often less melodic, they are just as important as the Soprano part. So, encourage the lower voices to think of their parts not only as harmonic support, but as melodic entities unto themselves. In New York Voices, we often talk about thinking in two planes at once: the vertical plane involves tuning, matching vowels and tone, and dynamics, while the horizontal plane involves the melodic direction of all four parts.

Vibrato or no vibrato? As I mentioned earlier, vocal jazz is a direct off-shoot of instrumental jazz. Since the Bebop era and beyond, instrumental jazz has used vibrato sparingly, more as a color or device than as a natural part of the sound. This developed both for stylistic and harmonic reasons. By the nature of jazz writing, straight tone often is required to allow the harmonies to resonate properly, whether being played by a big band, or sung by a choir. With that said, there is room for some vibrato at times. Some songs may incorporate a looser style or gospel influences where vibrato is more appropriate. You also may find that longer chords may allow for vibrato to be added once the harmony has been established. Also, the larger your ensemble, the less room there is for vibrato.

A couple of closing thoughts:

• Listen, listen, and then listen some more. The more jazz your students listen to, the more comfortable they will become with the idiom.
• When picking repertoire, be realistic about the reach and abilities of your ensemble. We would all love to sing Gene Puerling arrangements, Take Six repertoire, or the entire New York Voices songbook, but most groups are not ready for that level of harmonic and rhythmic complexity. Explore easier and medium level repertoire to find music that will challenge you and your ensemble, without overwhelming them.
• Lastly, if you have an instrumental jazz program in your school, try to connect with the instrumental jazz faculty and students. Your instrumental jazz instructor might be able to add valuable input, and you also might find a few instrumental students that would like to sing in your ensemble. Who knows, you might have a budding young singer sitting in the sax section of your school’s big band. Come to think of it, that’s how I got my start in all of this vocal jazz craziness!”

Choral Cache Thursdays, the series, will post to www.pendersbuzz.com a couple of times a month, with information from our staff, our publisher partners, guest bloggers and more. Come back to this site, or access it from our main Home Page, to find out the latest buzz!

(Article provided by Alfred Publishing, Co.)